Power Outages Still A Huge Concern For Marylanders

BALTIMORE (WJZ)—A few days later and many of us are still digging out from that big snowstorm earlier this week. This is an all too familiar sight across Baltimore. Most of the main roads are clear, but side streets are still a mess. Of course, each night there is concern that untreated grounds will refreeze.

Weijia Jiang has more on another huge concern—power outages.

For the first time since they lost power on Wednesday night, the Harrison family is leaving their Curtis Bay house to stay with family.

“We’ve slept in the cold, and it’s not good,” said Randy Harrison.

“It’s been very cold, quiet and dark. Our homes are very vulnerable. No police presence, people can’t use facilities, food has spoiled,” said Kathleen Harrison.

“We pay our bill like everyone else,” Randy Harrison said, “We need our lights on.”

They are among the 200,000 some Marylanders who lost service during the thunder snowstorm that crippled the area.

Despite the many trees that fell on top of power lines, BGE crews have restored most customers—progress that means nothing to the Harrisons and their dozens of neighbors left in the dark.

“Every time I call they’re like, ‘We’ll be there, we’ll be there, we’ll be there,’ said Theresa Tracy, a Curtis Bay resident.

“I don’t understand what’s taking so long to get this section,” said Craig Urban, also of Curtis Bay. “It’s crazy.”

Of course, it’s not just power outages causing problems. Even days after the storm some streets have yet to see a snow plow, which makes for a dangerous situation.

So if you don’t have really good four-wheel drive, you’re stuck.

Some vehicles are still stuck on the side of the road after drivers abandoned them in gridlock—signs of frustration all around.

After pulling 12-14 hour days, BGE crews will be back to work 6 a.m. Saturday to restore power to about 7,000 customers who are still without electricity.

  • Joel

    12-14 hour days? Boo – freaking – hoo. BGE’s profit margins are practically unrivaled; they SHOULD be legally required to provide 24 hour a day service, using out of state contractors if necessary, whenever they are unable to provide service to paying customers for any reason.

    • JoAnne

      It was bad enough being without power for 19 hours, I can’t imagine being without heat any longer. I do feel for these people and I hope they can return, safely, to their own homes soon!

      • Kimberly

        JOAnne, no worries. The lights are on @ work…Kwest

    • JOEY

      You can’t work people 24 hours a day. If BGE had enough people to work 24 hours a day, you’d be crying about how much that costs year round. Out of state contractors are probably a hot commododity in these types of crisis. Who knows how many are available. Can’t have it both ways I’m afraid.

    • james

      It is BGE’s job to make sure the lines are clear of debris. They and so many other electric companies are too busy taking profit instead of updating the grid. The US has more power outage hours than any other industrialized nation. Japan has the fewest. It’s all greed people. Welcome to America.

  • Andymu

    If BGE would use some ofthe money they pay to Shattuck (sp.?) for bonuses on infrastructure, there would not be this problem.

  • Anon

    It’s not BGE’s fault that the trees fell. Who are you going to hold responsible for that?

  • JOEY

    If you never want a power interruption, ever, buy a generator. You live in the real world with real problems.

  • Guest

    I have been saying this for sometime now. If BGE would bury the power lines like they do in the newer subdivisions, they would have a lot less outages. there wouldn’t have to worry about falling limbs, etc., everytime there is a storm, thousands and thousands of people are without power. If BGE is making any profit, Constellation is taking it, instead of getting rid of overhead lines. There are crews in the area from Progress Energy and Duke Power in North Carolina helping to restore power. The problem is that BGE is also having to wait for roads to be cleared of snow, and cleaning up the debris from the fallen trees. Wake up BGE, we are in the 21st Century!

  • Guest

    Burying all the lines just ins’t that easy. First of all, it would cost $100’s of millions, adding to the rate base in which WE all would pay for in our electric rates. I pay too much already and not looking to pay more. You can’t expect a for profit company to give up all its profit and “donate” it to the common good. How would your 401K plan look if all those companies gave up their profits?
    Secondly, burying cables requires right of ways, easments, permisions from land owners, etc. Thirdly, buried cables go bad too. People dig into them, they corrode, etc.

  • bgelineman

    BGE has crews working around the clock. Boo Hoo? We risk our lives daily to restore and provide electric service and there has been workers killed or burned very badly in the past because this is a dangerous job.

    The comment above about making all lines underground hits the nail on the head. That is the truth that no one is willing to accept. BGE can’t just take money from their power plants and invest it in their system anymore due to de regulation. Want things to go back how it was, push for re regulation of power plants and BGE. That is on the lawmakers in Annapolis’ hands.

  • bgelineman

    BGE’s profits are regulated by the state. They have a certain budget and have a certain profit margin and there are federal regulations in place that BGE can not get funds from Constellation so they can only upgrade what the funds allow from rate payers.

    Deregulation created this problem, and it is not just here but industry wide.

blog comments powered by Disqus
Track Weather On The Go With Our App!

Listen Live