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Jeopardy Super Computer ‘Watson’ Returns To Baltimore

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BALTIMORE (WJZ)—A super computer that bested two of Jeopardy’s smartest players comes to Baltimore.

Gigi Barnett explains some city students got a chance to beat Watson.

On the game show Jeopardy, a super computer that understands common language, bested two of the world’s top players. It’s called Watson.

Watson was developed by IBM, which celebrates its 100th anniversary Thursday.

On Wednesday at Digital Harbor High School, Baltimore students — with the help of IBM workers — learned how the super computer works and tried their hand at stumping it.

“I think the computer can give quicker answers, but we can give hard questions,” said Avanta Sutton, student.

Although Watson can sift through pages of information in three seconds and understand the way we speak it, sometimes it can’t understand subtle nuances of language or culture.

“Watson doesn’t have logical sense, and I do as a human,” said Isaiah Mason, student.

It took IBM scientists four years to create Watson. In honor of the company’s 100th anniversary, IBM’s CEO says it was important for him to bring it to Baltimore because this is his hometown.

“We thought it was something that could excite kids about math and science and the STEM program,” said Samuel Palmisano, IBM CEO. “We’re looking for ways to get young people excited to go math and science. It’s important and will solve a lot of society’s problems in the future.”

It’s possible computers — like Watson — may be in control then.

Students also learned that Watson was named after IBM founder Thomas Watson.

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