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Md. Company Will Provide In-Car Shots Of Baltimore Grand Prix

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Schuh Mike 370x278 (2) Mike Schuh
Mike Schuh joined WJZ Eyewitness News as a general assignment reporter...
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HANOVER, Md. (WJZ)—When millions tune into the worldwide coverage of the IndyCar race here in Baltimore this weekend, they’ll see incredible shots from inside the car.

Mike Schuh reports that the company responsible is from Anne Arundel County.

How do you get a TV image broadcast around the world? This is one of the cameras it fits on the race car right above the driver’s head.

Fifteen years ago, Peter Larsson located his company, Broadcast Sports Inc., in Maryland.

If you’ve seen an in-car camera shot at an American event, odds are his company provided the cameras.

At the Convention Center, Stan Miller just finished up installing $100,000 worth of TV gear.

“It’s a very big responsibility,” Miller said.

Big because nobody outside the crew gets to work on these million dollar missiles.

This Maryland company has spent years earning the trust of the people who own, build and maintain these cars.

“They’re very thorough in what they do,” said Sean Hanrahan, chief mechanic.

So, by the time the rubber meets the road, those building the cars have confidence that BSI TV techs haven’t caused a problem. Once the guys are done wiring up the cars and making all this stuff happen, they’re at consoles actually running the cameras on the cars.

Not bad for an Australian who came here in the early ’80s working out of a small garage.

“Luckily we’re the 100 pound gorilla at the moment in the U.S.,” Larsson said. “We provide for IndyCar, NASCAR.”

A good finish for these guys is “when a camera car crosses the checkered flag, and the guy goes like this,  ‘Yes,’” Miller said.

This weekend, six cars will have the cameras–all racing here in Maryland.

“That’s what’s very cool about this race,” Larsson said. “It’s one of the very few times we get to work in the state of Maryland.”

They start testing their gear Friday when practice opens on the racecourse.

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