Doctors Warn Against Repeat C-Sections

TOWSON, Md. (WJZ) — For women about to go into labor on this Labor Day, some doctors want to remind moms about the benefits of vaginal births over C-sections.

Andrea Fujii explains why some experts say they may be safer.

They are healthy sisters born in different ways.  Four-year-old Emerson was delivered by emergency C-section, while 1-year-old Penelope was delivered through vaginal birth at St. Joseph Medical Center.

“I definitely wanted a chance at giving birth to my second baby,” said Elizabeth Smith, mother.

Many doctors applaud that idea.

“You don’t have to have a second C-section if you’ve had one C-section,” said Dr. Judith Rossiter, St. Joseph OBGYN.

A recent study found one in three Maryland women choose C-sections, and more are opting for them again with their second child.  But doctors warn against that.

“The risk of infection, blood loss, the need for a blood transfusion, the need for a hysterectomy,” said Rossiter.

After having 1-month-old Devyn vaginally, Carol Parreco says a shorter recovery time was just one benefit of a vaginal birth, compared to her C-section with 2-year-old Olivia.

“The best part for me is when she was delivered, I held her. She came straight to me,” said Parreco.

The average cost of a vaginal birth is about $2,000 less than a C-section.

Sometimes Cesarian births are necessary, but some doctors and mothers say if there’s a choice, opt for a vaginal birth for the physical and emotional benefits.

“It was beautiful. It really was. Just to be able to feel everything and be awake,” said Smith.

Doctors also say there’s a much smaller risk of a prior C-section scar re-opening with a vaginal birth compared to a second Cesarian.

The study was conducted by the National Institutes of Health.

Comments

One Comment

  1. VBAC mom says:

    Why is this piece being framed as women “choosing cesareans” instead of doctor’s “giving” cesareans to women? Since any scheduled cesarean is coded as “elective” (whereas non-scheduled ones are coded “emergency”), there simply isn’t any data available that shows how many women truly “elect” their cesareans and the numbers are thought to be less than 1% of the national total. There were 67 VBACs at St. Joe’s in 2010 compared to 284 repeat cesreans (see http://mhcc.maryland.gov/consumerinfo/hospitalguide/hospital_guide/reports/find_a_condition/condition_types_b.asp?condition_cd=Moms) I’m hoping that the doctor quoted from there is doing everything possible to turn those numbers around.

  2. VBAC Hopeful says:

    Perhaps the study should include the reason for disappointment in moms who planned vaginal births and ended in c-section. I had an unplanned c-section that wasn’t an emergency, but I did agree to it without really being informed of the risks of the surgery and the “consequences”. I didn’t even realize there was any controversy over having vaginal births later and didn’t know anything about “VBAC” until after I had a miscarriage a year after my first child was born. Lets not confuse the results of this study with women (generalized) as gaining more fulfilment from the outcome of RCS.

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