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Meghan McCorkell joined the Eyewitness News team in July 2011 as a...
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BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Split verdict. The Supreme Court upholds Arizona’s controversial immigration law while striking down some of its key provisions. That has both sides claiming victory. Meghan McCorkell has more on this controversial ruling.

This has been a long-awaited decision. The president sued the state of Arizona to prevent that law from taking effect. Now it appears one key part will be enforced.

Mario Chihuahua was pulled over by a sheriff’s deputy for making an illegal turn in Phoenix.

“He asked me, `Where you was born?’ Well, you know, you don’t have the right to ask me that question,” he said.

But according to a Supreme Court ruling, Arizona police will be required to check the immigration status of people they detain. The ruling has supporters claiming victory.

“The heart of Senate bill 1070 has been proven to be constitutional,” said Governor Jan Brewer.

But opponents also consider themselves victorious after the high court blocked many key provisions in the law requiring immigrants to carry registration papers at all times, banning them from looking for work and allowing police to arrest immigrants without a warrant.

Hispanic leaders here in Baltimore say since the Arizona law was first proposed, they’ve seen an influx of people leaving Arizona and moving here to Maryland.

“A lot,” said Nicolas Ramos. “A lot of people from Arizona.”

Ramos is the chairman of the Baltimore City Hispanic Commission and owner of Arco’s Restaurant. He says he’s heard the stories of Hispanics constantly being stopped by police in Arizona.

“We no feel good in Arizona because we are stopped all the time and we show the driver’s license and the green card all the time,” Ramos said.

He says he believes the Supreme Court striking down much of the law is a step in the right direction.

In a statement, President Barack Obama also said he was happy the Supreme Court struck down most of the Arizona law.

The legal battle may not be over. The Supreme Court has left the door open for other challenges once the law takes effect, including claims it will lead to racial profiling.

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