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WEATHER BLOG: Hot For The Foreseeable Future

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timwilliams

While there won’t be any relief from the heat on the way, Thursday afternoon will feature lots of sunshine.

Dewpoint temperatures are forecasted to drop, but these really won’t until after 5 p.m., so the concept
that it’ll be “turning less humid” later Thursday is technically correct, but probably it isn’t a point worth driving home
too hard.

After a brief shower Wednesday morning, the sun did manage to come out for several hours for the Fourth of July holiday, as anticipated. High temperatures just about everywhere but at the beaches were in the upper 90s (even 100 at the Inner Harbor), which is something else we had anticipated. But potent thunderstorms which eventually developed over much of New England, as well as in the Poconos Wednesday afternoon, took quite a while to drift to the south and east early Wednesday night. Therefore, even though the big fireworks displays in most cities along the I-95 corridor went off without a hitch, the time frame when most of the showers and thunderstorms occurred wasn’t between 4 and 8 p.m. but instead mostly between 7 and 11 p.m.

There were also some “renegade cells” that persisted until after 3 a.m. in southern Maryland and eastern Virginia, which most likely was the direct result of convection that fired up along old outflow boundaries of previous thunderstorms. The bottom line is the timing aspect of the thunderstorms Wednesday night could have been better, but the end result is still going to be the same.

As a ridge of high pressure maintains the drier air Thursday and into Friday, most lows will wind up in the 60s or the
lower 70s under a mostly clear sky, and then we’re in for another “surge” of even hotter and more humid air Saturday. While most temperatures on Friday afternoon will be in the 90s (with the hottest locations being those south of the Mason-Dixon Line), there will be some thermometers Saturday reaching the triple-digits along the I-95 corridor.

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