wjz-13 all-news-99-1-wnew 1057-the-fan 1300logo2_67x35

Local

Harford County Cleans Up After Suffering The Worst Damage From Superstorm Sandy

View Comments
harford county tree down
Hellgren Mike 370x278 (2) Mike Hellgren
WJZ general assignment reporter Mike Hellgren came to Maryland's News...
Read More

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up
Popular Entertainment Photo Galleries

POEts: The Legendary, The Celebrity, The Local, The ControversialPOEts: The Legendary, The Celebrity, The Local, The Controversial

Celebrities Born Outside The U.S.Celebrities Born Outside The U.S.

Top Celebrities On TwitterTop Celebrities On Twitter

Ranking Stephen KingRanking Stephen King

Famous Women Who Underwent Double MastectomiesFamous Women Who Underwent Double Mastectomies

» More Photo Galleries

FALLSTON, Md. (WJZ)– The eye of Sandy passed right over parts of Harford County, causing some of the worst damage in the state.

Mike Hellgren has more on the situation there.

Big trees have caused big problems with more than 1,000 people still without power.

Superstorm Sandy left a mess in Harford County and they’re still cleaning up.

About half the customers in Harford County lost power. While most of them have been restored, on a wooden stretch of Friendship Road that’s still without electricity, frustration has turned to outrage.

“It’s ridiculous because half of them came down and just looked at the line, about five of them, and then just left,” Terri Bauer said. “That’s it. People were driving over a power line and I called and said, ‘This is dangerous.’”

At the Conowingo Dam, some floodgates were open and the water rushed down the Susquehanna. The storm touched just about everyone, including the county executive.

“The roof leaked the very first part of the storm. And it’s all because which way the storm is coming, and then it ended up with the sump pump burning out and then, water in the basement,” County Executive David Craig said.

For many families, it’s going to take days to get back to normal.

“It did sound like a train,” Mary Copeland said. “I mean, we both looked at each other like, ‘What noise was that?’ You know, it was a really strange noise that we’d never heard before.”

By Thursday afternoon, only five roads were closed down from more than 50 at the peak of the storm.

“I have some friends and there are some pretty big trees down and stuff on their property,” Chip Yeager said.

As life returned to normal, for many, their thoughts were with those who had lost so much more.

“I’m glad that everybody knows that it’s going to be bad because we know what happened in New Jersey and lower New York,” Harvey Yeager said. “Everybody should listen when they know something’s coming.”

Concerns over carbon monoxide poisoning have sent several people in Harford County to the hospital. Remember to run generators outside where there’s proper ventilation.

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus