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Meningitis May Be To Blame For Glen Burnie Student’s Death

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Glen Burnie High School
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Meghan McCorkell joined the Eyewitness News team in July 2011 as a...
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GLEN BURNIE, Md. (WJZ) — Health scare in an Anne Arundel County high school. A student died from a possible case of bacterial meningitis. Now the school system has put out a warning to parents.

Meghan McCorkell has more on this tragedy.

The student who died was a female junior at Glen Burnie High School. Now the Health Department is trying to confirm if she had bacterial meningitis.

Classmates identify the student who died as Ty’Niajah Devonshire. School officials say the Glen Burnie High School junior fell ill on Monday with a possible case of bacterial meningitis. She died Tuesday.

“We’re in shock and really our hearts and prayers go out to those parents. It could be any of us,” said Nkossi Dampita, a parent of a classmate.

News of her death spread quickly on social media.

“My daughter found out about it last night on Facebook so she let me know last night,” said parent Nicki Butler.

School leaders are now working with the Health Department to protect students.

“At this point, we have no medical confirmed diagnosis. However, all the symptoms we’re learning from the Health Department were consistent with bacterial meningitis,” said Bob Mosier, Anne Arundel County Public Schools spokesperson.

School officials sent a letter home to parents Wednesday, warning them to be on the lookout for symptoms in their children. Those symptoms include chills, fever, vomiting, headache, stiff neck and a rash.

Dr. Teri Muns with the emergency department at Medstar Good Samaritan Hospital says if students experience symptoms, they need care right away.

“If there’s any question, just call your pediatrician,” Muns said. “But go immediately to the emergency room to be evaluated.”

For now, parents are taking precautions.

“I just always try to encourage my kids to pay attention to people around them and wash their hands and take care of themselves,” said parent Cheryl Jackson.

Bacterial meningitis is not considered highly contagious. School officials say classmates are probably not at risk.

The school has brought in grief counselors for any students that need to talk.

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