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Plenty Of Christmas Trees Are Still Available

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PERRY HALL, Md. (WJZ) — We’re just days away from Christmas, but if you haven’t picked up a Christmas tree yet, there’s good news. Tree farmers say despite the crazy weather, this year’s crop is good and still plentiful.

Tim Williams has more.

It’s the one location where shoppers are going green–albeit at a cost.

“I have to do a lot of the cleaning up once the tree is up and the pinecones start falling and the cats decide to chase each other up and down the tree,” said Lorri Dugan.

But for the Dugan family of Catonsville, cutting down and buying a fresh Christmas tree makes the holiday season complete.

“The kids enjoy it so it’s worth it, especially this week,” she said.

At the Frostee Tree Farm in Perry Hall, the stock is healthy and plentiful and business is slow but steady heading into the final days before Christmas.

“This has been an overall good year for us and we really have met our expectation so far this year but it was still a challenging year with the weather and everything,” said tree farmer Paul Stiffler.

Stiffler says tree farmers battled drought in the spring, too much rain in the summer, followed by the wind and damage from Sandy. Still, the prices and crop weren’t shaken up too much and last-minute buyers have a choice.

“They can still find a tree here, although some of our Douglas fir have been picked over and our blue spruce. We still have plenty of white pine and Norways for them to get now,” Stiffler said.

But time is running out.

Farmers say the drought out west took a harder toll than weather here in the east.

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