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Supreme Court Will Hear 2 Cases That Could Define Marriage For The Nation

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Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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Mary Bubala joined WJZ in December 2003. She now anchors the 4-4:30...
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WASHINGTON (WJZ)—On Tuesday, the issue of same-sex marriage will be in front of the nation’s highest court. This week, justices will hear arguments on two cases that could define marriage for the nation.

Mary Bubala has more on the impact here in Maryland and the nation.

At the U.S. Supreme Court, people are already lining up to get in to see the arguments.

Some have been camping out since Thursday.  There’s a lot at stake.

The justices will hear two big cases on same-sex marriage. First on Tuesday is whether the voters can say no to same-sex marriage, as they did in California with Proposition 8.

“The freedom to marry is one of the precious freedoms that all of us cherish, and gay people like non-gay people deserve under the Constitution the ability to shape a family to build a life and to have these dreams,” said Evan Wolfson, Freedom to Marry.

Supporters of the ban say it is a state issue.

“The last thing we need is to shut down the debate, have the Supreme Court redefine marriage for everybody, instead of letting us work through this question through our democratic institutions,” said Austin Nimocks, Alliance Defending Freedom.

On Wednesday, the justices hear a second case focusing on the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act. It defines marriage as between a man and a woman.

Opponents say it discriminates by denying federal benefits to married same-sex couples.

Same-sex marriage supporters rallied this weekend across the country and will be heading to Washington, D.C. on Tuesday.

Only Maryland, eight other states and the District of Columbia allow same-sex marriages.

But the court’s ruling could impact the whole country.

That’s why Ravens linebacker Brendon Ayanbadejo spoke out on Sunday’s Face The Nation.

“It’s just the evolution of civil rights and equal rights, and athletes do a lot to change society, and this is something we can make a big difference on,” Ayanbadejo said.

The justices are not expected to issue their decisions until late June.

Maryland’s Marriage Equality plans to bus people to Washington on Tuesday for rallies in front of the Supreme Court.

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