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Heavy Rain Triggered Flash Flooding In Carroll County

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Alex DeMetrick 370x278 Alex DeMetrick
Alex DeMetrick has been a general assignment reporter with WJZ...
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CARROLL COUNTY, Md. (WJZ) — Severe weather wreaked havoc on the region Monday and now more may be on the way.

Alex DeMetrick found damage in Carroll County not caused by wind.

The damage was caused by water as heavy rain triggered flash flooding.

Streams and rivers were still running high between Mount Airy and Woodbine, but not like they were Monday night.

“Oh, it was terrible down here for a while. Really got up,” said Margaret Fritz, Mount Airy.

A stream along Twin Arch Road was back where it belonged, but for several hours, it had closed off the road, leaving some stranded.

“I had to come in the Hoard County side here, try to get her out of her house,” said Susan Holt. “I couldn’t get in.”

Flash floods left debris in guardrails and chewed away stretches of road in some spots. Carroll County crews spent the day filling in what they could.

“It washed the pipes. The problem was the pipes couldn’t handle the water, the amount of water coming down,” said Jerry Shue.

On John Pickett Road, that water swept away a large section of the bank, leaving just the guardrail and exposing a drainage pipe that was hidden inside the bank.

The eroding power of water created a sinkhole under an access road.

“It goes all the way under the road into the riverbed and so now we can’t use our driveway until we can get it repaired,” said Jane Harrison.

Click here to see a slideshow of the severe weather and upload your own pictures.

“I tell you, it was scary. I have not seen this much water in…we’ve been here 26 years,” said Mary Stevens.

That water washed over and under a bridge leading to a farm. When the water dropped, the bridge was gone, along with the only way in or out.

“So we’re stuck,” Stevens said. “I’ll be at work as soon as I can get there.”

“Soon” being relative at a time like this.

While repairs to lost bridges and sinkholes will take time, Carroll County has managed to reopen all flooded roads.

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