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Sewage Overflows Into Stoney Run Stream

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BALTIMORE (WJZ) — For the second time in less than a month, sewage overflowed into the Stoney Run Stream near Johns Hopkins University.

Monique Griego has more on what caused the problem this time.

Crews from the Department of Public Works are once again on the hunt for the source of the sewage problem near Johns Hopkins University.

“I was sitting on a particular spot and I noticed white, milky discharge coming from a pipe,” said Allen Baker. “It smelled like sewage.”

Baker noticed the sewage as it flowed down the Stoney Run Creek off of Linkwood Road. This is the second overflow into the stream within a month. Last time, crews used green dye to try and pinpoint a source but not before more than 28,000 gallons spilled into the water.

“Obviously it’s not supposed to happen, but when it does, we work to get it alleviated as soon as we can,” said Jeff Raymond, Department of Public Works.

DPW says this spill and the one a few weeks ago aren’t related. This time, instead of a broken pipe, a choked sewage line caused the overflow.

“The sewer water has to go somewhere and it ends up backing up, unfortunately, into the storm water system and on into the waterways,” Raymond said.

Workers spent the morning unclogging the pipe. After that, Raymond says the sewage should flow normally again, which means away from the stream and storm water system.

“It all ends up in our harbor and that’s why it’s important to keep it clean when we know there’s a problem,” Raymond said.

While residents are happy DPW tackled the problem quickly, they’re hoping this spill is the last.

“I don’t like the smell. I’d like to see a cleaner stream here,” Baker said. “It’s just the exposure to that bacteria. You don’t want it.”

DPW says problems like this are why they advise people to stay out of urban streams.

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