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Local Egyptians React To Unrest In Their Home Country

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BALTIMORE (WJZ) — After days of unrest, Egypt’s military successfully removed the country’s democratic leader from power.

Monique Griego has the latest on what’s next for the country and reaction from local Egyptians.

Celebrations erupted in Tahrir Square as the Egyptian army chief took to the airwaves to say Mohammed Morsi is no longer the country’s president. The military has suspended the constitution and tapped Egypt’s top judge to run the country until new elections are held.

“I don’t think anyone here wants the army to come back and govern the country so I think all the cheering and all the excitement is because it’s seen like the gov, the army is saying ‘we are with you. We are protecting you, and we realize how serious this is,'” said Fahd al Tarzi.

Anti-government protesters started filling the streets Sunday, angry that Morsi had grabbed too much power and demanding he step down. When a compromise couldn’t be reached, troops started deploying across Cairo.

Thousands of miles away, Egyptians in Baltimore stayed glued to news coverage.

“It’s kind of that feeling where you want to jump into the screen,” said Ahmed Elsayed.

Elsayed’s parents were both born in Egypt and the family maintains strong ties to the country. While watching things unravel can be difficult, he hopes this week’s move by the military changes things for the better.

“Any opportunity you have a chance to press a reset button, it is a hopeful time. A happy time,” he said.

But there is also a real fear of violence. While Morsi is believed to be under house arrest, some of his supporters are vowing to fight for him. That’s already led to violent clashes between both sides.

Since the demonstrations started, at least eight people have been killed—including an American student from Maryland.

The army insists it is not carrying out a coup, instead acting on the will of the people. Whether or not the Obama administration sees it as a military coup could impact future US aid to Egypt.

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