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Md. Camper Bitten By Copperhead Snake

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STREET, Md. (WJZ) — A warning in Harford County after a student at summer camp was bitten by a poisonous copperhead snake. Wildlife experts say the heat may be bringing out the dangerous reptiles.

Kai Jackson explains that has people in parts of Maryland concerned.

This snake bite incident has Marylanders being reminded to be aware of their surroundings when they’re outdoors.

A poisonous snakebite at the popular Camp Moshava in northern Harford County has caught many off guard. Officials say an older camper was bitten about 10 p.m. Monday on the toe by a copperhead snake.

“My understanding is that one of the campers was in the tent some time at night, stepped out of the tent…in sandals, tread on the snake and got bit on the foot,” said Glenn Therres, DNR.

The Whiteford Volunteer Fire Company responded to the call. The camper was taken to a local hospital and remains in stable condition.

Those who spend time outdoors say the best defense against snakes and other wildlife is to be aware of your surroundings and give animals their space.

“I’d say just be conscious of the fact that the snakes might be out there and they don’t really stand their ground so as long as you give ‘em some room, they’ll either slither around you or you can get around them,” said Andrew Fisher.

The Department of Natural Resources says copperheads have a presence in Maryland but not in great numbers.

Julekha Dash, a viewer in Ellicott City, Tweeted out that a copperhead is hiding under her porch.

The northern copperhead is one of only two venomous snakes indigenous to Maryland. The other is the timber rattlesnake.

DNR says bite victims will feel a burning sensation at the point of the bite.

“You should immediately go to the emergency room and seek medical advice,” Therres said.

Copperheads are most common in the mountain region of western Maryland.

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