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One Year Later: Md. Awarded $19M In Superstorm Sandy Aid

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Jessica Kartalija 3 Jessica Kartalija
Jessica Kartalija joined the Eyewitness News team during the summer of...
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EASTON, Md. (WJZ) –It’s been one year since Superstorm Sandy battered the Northeast, and communities are still picking up the pieces. The damage up the East Coast was catastrophic, mostly in New Jersey and New York.  At least 147 people died, more than a half million homes were destroyed and damage reached $50 billion.

Jessica Kartalija takes a closer look at the damage in Maryland. One year later, the state is still getting federal assistance.

It’s the first anniversary of Sandy.

Photo Gallery: Remembering Superstorm Sandy One Year Later

“This is the highest I have ever seen the tide in my lifetime. We were down here a half hour ago and we had to turn around,” a Maryland man said last year, describing the storm surge in his neighborhood.

The superstorm hit the state with record-breaking winds, rain and snow.

“What they are worried about here is the storm surge. They’re worried about water. They are worried about flooding,” Mike Hellgren reported last October.

Eleven Marylanders were killed with some $47 million in damage.

One year later,  the Department of Housing and Urban Development is awarding $19 million to Maryland towns hit the hardest.

Photo Gallery: Sandy Relief In Pictures

“The money will be coming from the federal government and distributed on the Lower Shore. The money will be distributed on the basis of need,” said Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md.

Funding goes toward economic development, job creation and reconstruction.

“It was devastating. The entire town was flooded. When I say the entire town, I mean the entire town. Everything was flooded,” said Percy Purnell Jr., mayor of Crisfield.

In Crisfield, coffins floated out of graves, and residents were rushed to shelters. The town dock was swept away.

“That’s where our bay commerce comes through every day,” Purnell said.

Now, they’re rebuilding.

There’s still plenty of work to be done. More than 200 Maryland homes are still in need of repair.

“Try to get the help we need to start rebuilding,” one woman said.

With this aid, Sen. Mikulski’s office says Maryland will have received more than $73.5 million in federal funds related to the storm.

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