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Storm Damage May Cost AACO Millions To Repair

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GLEN BURNIE, Md. (WJZ) — Costly cleanup. This week’s heavy flooding caused loads of damage across the state. Now Maryland’s hardest hit county may have to spend millions just to get its roads up and running again.

Rick Ritter has details.

Officials say the amount of rainfall Tuesday is similar to a 200-year storm event in parts of Anne Arundel County. The damage could cost more than $3 million just to fix.

Washed out roads, sidewalks torn apart and drivers stranded. It’s all the aftermath of Mother Nature’s wrath from Tuesday.

“It was like Niagara Falls in the backyard. The wall, the water, the door busted open,” one woman said.

No area was hit harder than Anne Arundel County. Drenched with more than ten inches of rain, homes and businesses turned to swimming pools–like John Hartlove’s auto shop in Pasadena.

“Nothing quite like that. Amazing amount of water and flooding,” Hartlove said.

From high above, Sky Eye Chopper 13 captured the destruction.

On the ground, crews work to repair a washout along Marley Neck Road. It’s a knockout punch that will cost the county $1.7 million along that stretch alone.

“This is about as extensive as I’ve seen in any given one location,” said Chris Phipps, Anne Arundel County Department of Public Workers director.

In Annapolis, crews found a retaining wall separating from the sidewalk near the Spa Creek Bridge. It’s one of many repairs across the state that could take weeks.

While Mother Nature left Anne Arundel County with a pricey bill, many are preparing for her next round of storms, knowing the summer isn’t over just yet.

“We have some plans in place to keep the damage to a minimum,” Hartlove said.

“As bad as it looks, it could have been a lot worse,” said Phipps.

At last check, at least 15 roads remain closed in Anne Arundel County due to flooding and repairs.

The Department of Public Works says excess rainfall also caused sanitary sewer overflows at multiple locations.

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