WJZ-13
105.7 The Fan
CBS Sports Radio 1300

The ‘Fight For 15’ Continues In Maryland General Assembly

Author: Pat Warren

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ) — Following the footsteps of Baltimore City, there’s a move in the General Assembly to raise the minimum wage to $15 dollars an hour. This would be the second new state minimum wage law in three years.

“No one who works hard should have to live in poverty,” says Justin Vest, with Progressive Maryland.

Maryland workers saw their first increase in 2015 from $7.25 to $8 dollars an hour. Each year brought another bump, to $8.25 and $8.75. It reaches $9.25 in July and $10.10 in 2018.

On Tuesday, the fight is for $15 continues.

“Because the simple reality is there’s not a single country where a working family can earn less than $15 dollars an hour and actually afford the necessities of life,” says Vest.

Baltimore City Council Monday gave preliminary approval to its own $15 dollar minimum, but there are concerns about the impact on businesses in the area. If the bill in Annapolis becomes state law, that would even the playing field.

“For all workers – that means our youth workers, our tips workers, our state workers and every single worker in between,” says Vest.

There are more than 50 sponsors in the House of Delegates.

Montgomery County passed it’s own $15 dollar minimum, but the County Executive vetoed it because it was out of line with the state. Mayor Pugh hasn’t said if she would sign a Baltimore Bill.

Another bill introduced this session would prevent local jurisdictions from setting their own minimum wage.

Following the footsteps of Baltimore City, there’s a move in the General Assembly to raise the minimum wage to $15 dollars an hour. This would be the second new state minimum wage law in three years.

“No one who works hard should have to live in poverty,” says Justin Vest, with Progressive Maryland.

Maryland workers saw their first increase in 2015 from $7.25 to $8 dollars an hour. Each year brought another bump, to $8.25 and $8.75. It reaches $9.25 in July and $10.10 in 2018.

On Tuesday, the fight for $15 continues.

“Because the simple reality is there’s not a single country where a working family can earn less than $15 dollars an hour and actually afford the necessities of life,” says Vest.

Baltimore City Council Monday gave preliminary approval to its own $15 dollar minimum, but there are concerns about the impact on businesses in the area. If the bill in Annapolis becomes state law, that would even the playing field.

“For all workers – that means our youth workers, our tips workers, our state workers and every single worker in between,” says Vest.

There are more than 50 sponsors in the House of Delegates.

Montgomery County passed its own $15 dollar minimum, but the County Executive vetoed it because it was out of line with the state. Mayor Pugh hasn’t said if she would sign a Baltimore Bill.

Another bill introduced this session would prevent local jurisdictions from setting their own minimum wage.

Follow @CBSBaltimore on Twitter and like WJZ-TV | CBS Baltimore on Facebook

Visit Full Site