City Police Creates Dirt Bike Task Force

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The Baltimore City Police Department is stepping up their effort to keep this dangerous activity off our streets.

Tracey Leong explains how the Dirt Bike Task Force is also relying on the public for help.

Sunday is typically their busiest day, but with the weather warming up, Baltimore Police has seen an uptick in young riders, so they are out in full force seven days a week.

WJZ has gained exclusive access to the officers cracking down on illegal dirt bike riders cruising Baltimore’s streets.

Police helicopter Foxtrot alerted officers when it spotted the rider’s dangerous activity from the sky.

“We will review the video that Foxtrot has of him, and whatever red light he ran, or stop sign he ran, senseless speed, unsafe lane change he will be charged with,” says Baltimore Police Sgt. Christopher Warren.

The Dirt Bike Task Force is also relying on the public to report the illegal activity people are urged to call text or email them directly.

These riders put themselves, other motorists, pedestrians and even young children at risk of reckless behavior.

“Was a safety issue, not having eye protection or helmet so gave the information to the parent to keep the bike off the street,” says David Jones, Baltimore police detective.

Baltimore Police want to send a warning that this dangerous dirt bike behavior is simply unacceptable.

“Not just the dirt bike riders, but the cars that followed them causing headaches causing hit and runs, dirt bike riders causing hit and run deaths,” says Christopher Warren, Baltimore Police Sgt.

Last year the dirt bike task force seized around 150 dirt bikes and eight handguns.

The Dirt Bike Task Force number is 443-902-4474 and their email is dirtbiketips@baltimorepolice.org.

More from Tracey Leong
Comments

One Comment

  1. Bob Smoke says:

    Why not just create a dirt bike track in a part of bmore that they could ride. SMH. All about ruining the youths live with police records.

    1. The problem is the legality. Since they have engines, they have to be registered and operated by a licensed owner. If someone took an illegal bike and got hurt in a city owned park, they’d sue for millions.

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