Lawmakers And Environmentalists Push Hogan For Tougher Pollution Rules

BALTIMORE (WJZ)– Environmentalists and 49 state Democrats are urging the Hogan administration to impose tougher water pollution standards on coal-fired power plants and not wait for rules delayed by the Trump administration. That’s according to our media partners at The Baltimore Sun.

Water pollution permits for three of the state’s seven-coal fired plants are up for renewal. Initially, Maryland proposed permits that wouldn’t require the power plants to immediately install technology that would significantly reduce heavy metals discharged into waterways.

Rules from the Obama administration would have required these power plants to install technology next year to reduce the amount of selenium, arsenic, mercury, and lead released in their waste water.

This year, President Trump tried to repeal the “Effluent Limit Guidelines” that required all plants to use the “best available technology” by 2018 to reduce the heavy metals released into the water. Then the EPA delayed the effective date of those rules.

In a letter to Governor Hogan, environmentalists and Democrats urged the Republican governor to act sooner than the federal government requires.

The letter obtained by The Baltimore Sun reads in part:

“There are simple and affordable ways for coal plants to reduce or eliminate their toxic waste, and many coal plants across the country have already done so. But for the change in the presidency, Maryland’s plants would have been required to make similar changes to reduce excessive amounts of cancer-causing toxins from flowing unchecked into our waterways. We call on you do what’s right for our citizens, our environment and our natural resources.”

Governor Hogan’s administration has already taken on the EPA under President Trump. In September, Maryland sued the EPA saying it had not done enough to enforce air-quality laws that the federal government was letting pollution from coal-powered plants in five other states degrade air quality here.

This pending lawsuit deals with enforcement of the federal Clean Air Act. The re-permitting of coal plants that’s in discussion in Maryland deals with rules under the federal Clean Water Act.

The state is proposing they do so by the deadline in current federal guidelines between 2020 and 2023 and not by the 2018 deadline proposed by the Obama administration.

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Comments

One Comment

  1. Thanks for reporting on this topic. People do not realize the effects on our water until it is too later. So quickly, the Flint water problem is out of the news and we go on as usual. We should feel lucky that our governor Hogan is fighting to keep our water and air clean.

    What crazy is there is another major water issue that no one is discussing and you can’t regulate microfiber water pollution. Researchers are only discovering how much plastic pollutes our water. People are just starting to discuss microfiber water pollution which comes from our polyester clothing. Every time you wash your polyester clothes these tiny particles are released into our waters and are showing up all over the world. Fish are eating these tiny particles and eventually we could be eating the fish. Even our tap water is shown having these plastic particles. Scientists do not even know the long tern health effects at this time.

    It’s great that we are trying to reduce pollution from our power plants but we also need to realize we are polluting our waters from many sources.

    Stuart – http://www.bluezippercool.com

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