Useless Body Parts

Humans used to have to chew a lot plants to get enough food to survive, therefore the extra teeth. Today, only about 5 percent of the population has a healthy set of Wisdom Teeth. Source: Discover Magazine (credit: AP)
Wisdom Teeth Humans used to have to chew a lot plants to get enough food to survive, therefore the extra teeth. Today, only about 5 percent of the population has a healthy set of Wisdom Teeth. Source: Discover Magazine (credit: AP)
A long muscle that runs from the elbow to the wrist. It could have been important for hanging and climbing. 11 percent of people do not have one. Source: Discover Magazine (credit:AP)
Palmaris Muscle A long muscle that runs from the elbow to the wrist. It could have been important for hanging and climbing. 11 percent of people do not have one. Source: Discover Magazine (credit:AP)
Eyebrows help keep sweat out of the eyes and women may be attracted by male facial hair, but most of our body hair serves no function or purpose. Source: Discover Magazine
Body Hair
Credit: AP
Eyebrows help keep sweat out of the eyes and women may be attracted by male facial hair, but most of our body hair serves no function or purpose. Source: Discover Magazine
Three muscles that made it possible for early man to move their ears independently of their heads, the way that dogs and cats can. These muscles are why some people can learn to wiggle their ears. Source: Discover Magazine (Credit: AP)
Extrinsic Ear Muscles Three muscles that made it possible for early man to move their ears independently of their heads, the way that dogs and cats can. These muscles are why some people can learn to wiggle their ears. Source: Discover Magazine (Credit: AP)
The tail bone. The fused bones are all that’s left of the tail that most mammals used for balance and communication. Some people think the coccyx helps support organs or that muscles are attached to it, but they can be removed without any health problems. Source: Discover Magazine (credit: AP)
Coccyx The tail bone. The fused bones are all that’s left of the tail that most mammals used for balance and communication. Some people think the coccyx helps support organs or that muscles are attached to it, but they can be removed without any health problems. Source: Discover Magazine (credit: AP)
Birds have them for protecting the eye and cleaning out debris. Humans still have a tiny fold in the inner corner of the eye. Source: Discover Magazine (credit: AP)
Third Eyelid Birds have them for protecting the eye and cleaning out debris. Humans still have a tiny fold in the inner corner of the eye. Source: Discover Magazine (credit: AP)
A set of small ribs that appear in less than 1% of the population. They can cause nerve and artery problems. They may be leftover from the age of reptiles. Source: Discover Magazine (credit: AP)
Neck Bone A set of small ribs that appear in less than 1% of the population. They can cause nerve and artery problems. They may be leftover from the age of reptiles. Source: Discover Magazine (credit: AP)
This foot muscle helps primates grasp with their feet. It’s disappeared in 9% of humans. Source: Discover Magazine (credit: AP)
Plantaris Muscle
Der kleine Schimpanse Dongo ist der Liebling des Zuercher Publikums, schaut am Mittwoch, 15. Maerz 2006 jedoch mit trauriger Mine in die Welt hinaus. Dongo wird zusammen mit sieben weiteren Schimpansen den Zuercher Zoo verlassen und nach Gelsenkirchen ins deutsche Ruhrgebiet ziehen. Dort beziehen die acht Tiere mit zwei weiteren Schimpansen der selben Unterart eine neu gebaute Anlage von 1.400 Quadratmetern. (KEYSTONE/Eddy Risch)
This foot muscle helps primates grasp with their feet. It’s disappeared in 9% of humans. Source: Discover Magazine (credit: AP)
Chimpanzees and gorillas have them. But only about 8% of humans have an extra rib. Source: Discover Magazine (credit: AP)
Thirteenth Rib Chimpanzees and gorillas have them. But only about 8% of humans have an extra rib. Source: Discover Magazine (credit: AP)
Three muscles that made it possible for early man to move their ears independently of their heads, the way that dogs and cats can. These muscles are why some people can learn to wiggle their ears. Source: Discover Magazine (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
Extrinsic Ear Muscles Three muscles that made it possible for early man to move their ears independently of their heads, the way that dogs and cats can. These muscles are why some people can learn to wiggle their ears. Source: Discover Magazine (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

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