By Pat Warren


ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ)—It is day two of early voting in Maryland and the race for governor is getting national attention as the Democrat and Republican parties compete for your votes.

Political reporter Pat Warren has more on this sudden interest.

It’s most notable that the Republican Governors Association is now producing ads for Larry Hogan and the Democratic Party is taking a look back at the Civil Rights Movement.

With a TV ad on taxes, the Republicans won’t let Democrat Anthony Brown shake the past of the Gov. Martin O’Malley administration.

“Higher income tax rates, a tax on mortgages, a rain tax, a flush tax, higher cost for healthcare, for being born, for dying,” the ad says.

Analyst Don Norris says this big red push for Hogan in big blue Maryland says something about the Republican party.

“It’s pretty clear that they sense an opportunity and the Democratic Governors Association is already pumping money in, they’re pumping more money and that means they sense a problem,” Norris said.

With a mailer on voting rights sent to thousands of voters, the Democrats won’t let the Republican Party shake the past of the Civil Rights Movement. But Anthony brown says it’s not directed at his opponent.

Reporter: “Are you suggesting that Larry Hogan would roll back the Civil Rights laws?”

“No, that mailer from the Democratic Party wasn’t geared towards any candidate,” Brown said. “This was geared to voters to remind voters that many people have struggled, suffered and sacrificed in order for all of us, all Americans, to exercise that right to vote.”

But that may not be how others see it.

“The African-American vote is going to go for him 95-98 percent, and that’s 25 percent of the electorate, so he’s only got to pick up another 25 percent, but there’s also a strong Republican, conservative Democratic and conservative Independent vote in this state that he can’t ignore and that alienates that vote,” Norris said.

Both candidates are focused on getting out the vote.

“Really this race is going to be decided on the issues here in Maryland,” Hogan said.

“Are you ready to build a better Maryland? So let’s go and build a better Maryland together,” Brown said.

Nearly 43,000 Marylanders cast ballots Thursday.

Marylanders can vote every day from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. now through Thursday at early voting locations where they live. For a complete guide on early voting, click here.

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