The rain Thursday managed to impact much of the mid-Atlantic states and Northeast in two waves, with the first one occurring during the morning and midday well inland, and then the other becoming well-organized along the coast late in the afternoon. This process, of course, could be attributed to two things: the overrunning precipitation that occurred early as moisture climbed over some dry and cool air near the surface, and the other was caused by a developing wave of low pressure, which is starting to pull away from New England early this morning. And, as that low pressure system starts to intensify just a bit, the pressure falls will create a stronger gradient between both it and a ridge of high pressure that is currently moving into the Great Lakes region. So, even though we’re expecting to see a few intervals of sun today, and temperatures will be in the lower or middle 50s this afternoon, a west wind that will be gusting as high as 35 mph will make it feel a bit chillier.

The sky should turn out mostly clear tonight. And with a diminishing wind, most temperatures will wind up near or even below freezing in some of the typically colder suburbs, but closer to 40 in most of the larger cities.  Saturday is looking as if it will be the nicer of the two days this weekend, with a good deal of sunshine. Although it will be chilly with most temperatures in the upper 40s or the lower 50s, there isn’t going to be any real strong wind that will make it feel colder.

We’ve been very curious about Sunday all week long because the models during the past four of five days have been sending strong signals that there will be a new low pressure system developing off of the coastal Carolinas. And now it is seeming more and more obvious to us that with a vigorous impulse of energy in the northern branch of the jet stream not making its connection with the body of low pressure located offshore, the weather should be dry for much of the region on Sunday. The only exceptions will be on central and eastern Long Island and in southern Connecticut on Sunday morning, and across the rest of New England for the rest of Sunday — as that low pressure system starts to gain a bit of momentum and it pushes Atlantic moisture back into these areas. But unlike LAST Sunday, it doesn’t look like Boston is in for a “snowy surprise” this weekend.