BALTIMORE (WJZ) — A community tries to rebuild following weeks of unrest in the wake of Freddie Gray’s death.

Amy Yensi has more on how they’re trying to heal.

As the rallies dissipate and dust settles, some unsettling questions remain in Freddie Gray’s neighborhood. The main one: where to go from here.

The protests are over and the noise has died down.

Reverend Keith Bailey knew Freddie Gray but he hasn’t had much time to mourn him.

“People don’t have any diapers, food. It’s a 24-hour thing for us,” he said.

With the local CVS looted and burned in the riots, donations are some of the only resources left.

“It’s a time where it’s needed. Everything is needed because people don’t have it and we have lost a lot of the stores are closed,” Bailey said.

One resident didn’t want to be identified but is optimistic.

“If everybody just gets together as one, you know, unity and fight for the right reasons, then everything will be alright, I feel like,” he said.

Those who knew Freddie Gray say they hope his legacy doesn’t stop here. They hope it leads to change here and other communities around the country.

“There have been days that I’ve caught myself looking for him, calling his name,” said friend Don Smith. “And he’s not here.”

Physically gone but living through art. Baltimore artist Nether is working on a mural.

“The concept of this mural is to show that the struggle that’s going on right now is a continuation of what happened in the civil rights movement,” Nether said.

The mural is a tribute to a friend and, some say, a reminder that race relations are a work in progress.

“It’s sad to say that we’re marching for the same things all those years later,” said Smith said.

The concept of the mural is still evolving. The artist plans to complete it in about a week.

Reverend Bailey is collecting donations around the clock and distributing them every evening starting at 6 p.m. in front of the Eternal Flame Flower Shop.

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