BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Suspected heroin found inside the Baltimore offices of the NAACP. Court records show the man now facing charges is the son of the organization’s president.

Meghan McCorkell has the dramatic video of the arrest.

The discovery was made as investigators were searching for a fugitive.

WJZ obtains dramatic video inside the Baltimore branch of the NAACP. Investigators searched the office at the end of April.

A police report shows they found: “A clear plastic capsule containing white powder, suspected heroin and an empty plastic capsule containing white powder residue, suspected heroin.”

Pictures show multiple syringes laid out on a table.

According to court documents, investigators came there looking for Theron Hill, who was wanted on an outstanding warrant. He is the son of NAACP President Tessa Hill-Aston.

But it was her other son, Dorjan Hill, that was found in the officers. Police say he admitted the drugs weer his.

His mother tells WJZ it’s a misunderstanding.

“In the court records it says there was suspected heroin that was found here. No, no. It was syringes with insulin or residue of insulin,” said Hill-Aston.

Hill-Aston says her son was at the building killing mice and did not have illegal drugs on him.

“My son has been stopped by the police and had his insulin and a needle with him and has gotten caught up–never been arrested for it–but has gotten stopped,” she said.

Court records show Dorjan Hill is currently facing drug charges in a 2014 arrest and has a previous marijuana possession conviction.

One former leader at the NAACP says he’s disappointed at these latest allegations.

“It’s just very unfortunate to bring the name down for the baddest and the boldest and the oldest civil rights organization in America,” said Joe Armstead, former NAACP leader.

Dorjan Hill is set to face a judge at the end of the month.

Tessa Hill-Aston says her son will plead not guilty.

Hill-Aston’s other son, Theron Hill, was also taken into custody late last month.

He was wanted on a warrant for fraud to avoid prosecution and making false statements to a police officer.

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