By Kimberly Eiten

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The University of Maryland’s marching band will no longer play “Maryland, My Maryland,” the official state song of Maryland, at school sporting events because of its ties to the Confederacy.

On Monday, the University of Maryland shared that its marching band has cut the Southern-leaning state song from its line-up. After the deadly rallies in Charlottesville, the controversial anthem will no longer be playing on the university’s campus at all.

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The song is a nine-verse war poem, put to music. It was used as a pro-Confederate battle hymn and talks of spurning the “Northern scum.”

Click here for the full lyrics for “Maryland, My Maryland.”

“To be honest, I don’t even know what the tune is. I’d be more upset if they didn’t play the fight song, I think,” said University of Maryland student, Chris Rogers.

Another student said that they didn’t think people would even notice.

Maryland lawmakers however, will certainly notice just as they did in 2016 when they launched into debates on to how to handle the pro-confederate tune.

 

University spokesperson Katie Lawson released the following statement:

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“As part of the university’s efforts to reaffirm our values as a campus community, we are assessing the songs that are played at Intercollegiate Athletic events. We are suspending the playing of “Maryland, My Maryland” to evaluate if it is consistent with the values of our institution at this time.”

With arguments that ultimately lead nowhere except for the wake of deadly white supremacy rallies in Charlottesville, there is the question if “Maryland, My Maryland” could be headed for the history books.

“I think it’s a little absurd to what lengths people are going to. They’re going to ban songs. They’re going to ban everything,” said student Monica Alston.

Another student, Cheyenne Jones, opposingly feels that doing away with the song is better.

“It makes more sense than trying to change lyrics to an old song anyway.”

In the past, Governor Hogan has pushed back against efforts to change the state song. In 2015, the university removed the name of a former school president and segregationist from it’ stadium.

Baltimore Mayor Catherine Pugh had the city’s four Confederate monuments removed earlier this month.

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