BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Do you have a pair of Apple AirPods?

Even though many users said they’re trendy and convenient, maintenance crews around the country are now finding the wireless earbuds on train tracks and on the floors of subway systems.

For Baltimore travelers, time is often of the essence and so is convenience.

“They are lighter,” said Rohit Kumar.

That’s why many opt for the AirPods.

“I take mass transit a lot, wires get caught all over the place, it’s just a little easier,” said John Browning, who uses the headphones.

According to one Wall Street analyst, Apple AirPods are bringing in between $10 billion and $12 billion in 2019 alone.

“A force toward how they’re making devices now,” said Quincy Hairston, another AirPod user.

The pricey ear gear can cost anywhere from $144 to $169. The wireless earbuds connect to your phone and let you listen to music or make a call, but are not always the most secure technology.

“While you are running, they can come easily out of your ear,” Kumar said.

Many of those missing AirPods are popping up on the floors of New York subways. This year alone, maintenance crews fished out 104 AirPod related devices.

Cell phones on the tracks remain the biggest problem, with 2,300 retrieved within the same one-year period.

“Whatever you do, don’t even think about jumping down to the tracks to go and retrieve your property,” said Andy Byford with New York Transit Authority. “Don’t ever, ever do that. You can’t rely on knowing when the next train will stop.”

MTA, Amtrak and BWI said phones are one of the most commonly misplaced devices, especially at airport security checks.

For those attached to detached earphones, good news for you: they aren’t lost nearly as often in Baltimore.

“This is the first pair I’ve had and I’ve kept the same paid, so lucky so far,” said John Browing, another AirPod user.

Amtrak and MTA officials said if you were to lose any of your devices on one of its platforms or trains, do not try to retrieve it on your own. They add to get in touch with an attendant to let them know whatever is lost.

Rachel Menitoff

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