BALTIMORE (WJZ) — The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted all areas of public and personal life, but none have faced a harsher reality than those disadvantaged populations experiencing health disparities.

The NAACP started a campaign at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic called #StayHomeBaltimore to inform people about the dangers of the virus.

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The NAACP drove a sound truck through city streets telling residents to “stay at home” during the coronavirus pandemic.

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The campaign was in an effort to dispel rumors that African Americans are immune to COVID-19.

Dr. Beth St. John and her team of researchers are studying the dangers of misinformation surrounding COVID-19.

“Perhaps the misinformation that is going around is actually maybe even scarier and more dangerous than even the virus itself,” St. John said.

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“I’ve seen people call this like an info-demic,” she added.

Nearly nine out of 10 adults may lack the information needed to manage their health and prevent disease, according to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy.

“Not having access to trustworthy health information can lead to poor health outcomes,” St. John said.

Dr. St. John said it’s why local libraries are more important now than ever.

“[There are] COVID-19 resources like links to CDC, links to World Health Organization,” St. John said. “So it’s really trustworthy information.”

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For the latest information on coronavirus go to the Maryland Health Department’s website or call 211. You can find all of WJZ’s coverage on coronavirus in Maryland here.

Annie Rose Ramos