BALTIMORE (WJZ) — It has been 90 years to the day since “The Star-Spangled Banner” became our National Anthem.

They’re words that mean something different to different people.

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“It made me feel proud to be from Baltimore,” a resident told WJZ. 

“It’s a patriotic symbol for the U.S., I think it’s been overused a little too much these days,” Ian Carlin said.

“As an immigrant from the Philippines, who has two Marine sons, ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ really means a lot to me, and every time it’s played, I shed a tear,” Rhoda Kublickis said.

“’The Star-Spangled Banner’” is the voice of America,” Tim Ertel, a Park Ranger at Fort McHenry, said. “It can be controversial, but it’s the story of the founding of our country.”

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It was originally penned as a poem by Francis Scott Key the morning after a 25-hour bombardment on Fort McHenry, known as The Battle of Baltimore During The War of 1812.

“Francis Scott Key was an eyewitness to the entire battle,” Ertel said. “The defenders of Fort McHenry inspired Francis Scott Key to pen those words.”

It would later be set to music, earning its current name “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

But it wasn’t until March 3, 1931, more than 115 years after it was written, it would become the National Anthem.

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“Herbert Hoover would sign the bill making ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ our National Anthem,” Ertel said.

Sean Streicher