SARASOTA, Fla. (WJZ) — The COVID-19 pandemic has led to increased isolation which has caused a rise in cases of depression.

Major League Baseball players are not immune to depression.

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Inside the Orioles’ Spring Training facility in Sarasota, Florida, players work in socially distanced groups. Some are even sent to a separate facility across town to ensure more distance.

Coaches and players get daily medical screenings, do their workouts and go home. There is no socializing in the locker room.

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On game days, a limited number of fans are allowed into the ballpark, but autographs are prohibited. After games, players go straight home.

When the season starts, teams will stay in hotels on the road and are restricted from interaction and socializing.

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“It’s hard to be just in the room, just watching TV and do nothing, especially if you have a bad day on the field,” Orioles shortstop Freddy Galvis said. “Yes, for sure you can get some depression and stuff like that.”

Isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic isolation led San Francisco Giants outfielder Drew Robinson to attempt suicide. He survived.

Los Angeles Angels infielder Andrelton Simmons made public that isolation led him to suicidal thoughts.

Orioles first baseman Chris Davis said he cried when he read of the suffering.

“And it’s like, what are we doing here? There have to be more conversations about things like that for there to be any sort of progress or any sort of solution,” Davis said.

“It’s not easy. I saw my wife and kids two days in the last three months I was gone,” Orioles manager Brandon Hyde said. “It’s extremely hard, extremely hard for everybody.”

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For the latest information on coronavirus go to the Maryland Health Department’s website or call 211. You can find all of WJZ’s coverage on coronavirus in Maryland here.