BOSTON (CBS) – A new study finds that a third of COVID-19 patients are diagnosed with a neurologic or psychiatric diagnosis in the six months after infection, more evidence that COVID can lead to long-term complications.

Researchers at the University of Oxford compared data on almost 240,000 patients with COVID-19 to a similar number of patients who had other respiratory infections, like the flu.

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Of the patients receiving a neurological or psychiatric diagnosis, about 13% received such a diagnosis for the first time.

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Anxiety, mood, and substance use disorders were most common, but some patients were also diagnosed with strokes, dementia, and other serious neurological problems.

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These neuropsychiatric disorders were more common among COVID-19 patients compared to those with the flu or other respiratory infections, prompting researchers to call for a closer look at why COVID-19 patients appear to be at higher risk for brain-related complications.