BALTIMORE (WJZ) — For decades, one Northeast Baltimore community near Lake Montebello has lived in fear that every time it rains, their homes will flood. But on Thursday, they got some good news.

City and state leaders announced a $5 million plan to help stop the flooding.

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One homeowner stood in front of his house and watched the mayor’s announcement.

“Hopefully they’re going to be fixing the flood problems that’s been going on here for years,” he said.

The resident who didn’t want to be identified said he purchased his home in the area because it is a safe community and schools were nearby, but it’s a decision he would have reconsidered if he’d known that the area was to susceptible flooding. He describes the area as a potential death trap.

“I almost saw somebody die out here before,” said the resident. “He got stuck in his car, I told him to get out. He was acting like he could back up and I was telling him to get out. And then a rush came and pushed him out.”

The area at Hillen Road and 35th Street has flooded for decades. WJZ covered a story in the same area last year when a bus got stuck.

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Mayor Brandon Scott went to Mervo High School which is in the same neighborhood. He referenced how long the flooding has been an issue.

“When we think about that picture from 1957, that’s two years before my dad was born, that’s how long this is been going on.”

“This isn’t going to happen tomorrow but we are working on it,” said City Councilwoman Odette Ramos. “You’ve been so patient, but you shouldn’t have to be.”

Once the research is done, The Department of Public Works is going to decide what kind of infrastructure will be needed to handle anything from a 10 to a 1,000-year flood. The project could ultimately take a few years to be complete.

Residents who’ve helplessly watched their homes flood year after year now see a silver lining after the cloud.

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“It brings tears to my eyes because before I leave here something is going to get done even if it doesn’t benefit me, it will benefit the neighborhood,” said Pamela Luallen Williams, a longtime resident of the community.

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