ANNAPOLIS (WJZ) — Governor Larry Hogan signed another 140 bills into law Monday at the statehouse alongside House Speaker Adrienne Jones and Senate President Bill Ferguson.

In addition to the $4 billion capital budget signed Monday, HB 1397 caps the copay or coinsurance of insulin to “no more than $30 for a 30-day supply.”

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A handful of transportation bills changes laws on Maryland roadways.

Notably, SB 147 expands Maryland’s existing “Move Over” law beyond public safety and service vehicles to include all vehicles stopped on the highway with warning lights, flashers, or other caution signals.

“We don’t want you to move over if it’s not safe to do so. But, what you can do is reduce your speed,” Ragina Ali of AAA Mid-Atlantic said. “This, we hope, will not only provide extra protections to motorists who may be stopped on the side of the road, but also our first responders and tow truck drivers providing aid to them.”

Once it goes into effect Oct. 1, Maryland will be the eighth state to offer these additional roadside protections.

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“Oh, yeah. I have been in that situation (on the side of the highway),” Delaware driver Octavia Flowers said at a rest area on I-95 Monday. “It makes me nervous sometimes, because sometimes it’s instant. Sudden.”

Much like the current law with emergency and service vehicles, violators of Maryland’s expanded “Move Over” law are subject to a fine up to $500.

HB 53 authorizes the city to use a monitoring system to record images of cars traveling in dedicated bus lanes. SB 61 further transitions the MTA bus fleet to zero-emissions with training and apprenticeships for its workforce.

SB 146 establishes signage and $100 fines for those violating electric vehicle charging spaces.

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For a complete list of Monday’s bills signed into law Monday, click here.

Paul Gessler