BALTIMORE (WJZ)–From San Bernardino, California, to Baltimore, many Muslims fearing retaliation for the attacks lead by terrorist of Muslim faith.

Right here in Baltimore, a group of Muslims leading an interfaith prayer vigil for the victims of recent attacks, while uniting a community.

WJZ’s Marcus Washington has more.

In a mosque in the Rosedale community of Baltimore County, a call for prayer.

In a response to the terror attacks in Paris and in San Bernardino the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is calling for unity and many people responded.

“It is our human duty, not just as a religious people but has humans, to give our condolences to victims of any kind of extremism, any kind of violence and unite against the extremism that is there to divide us,” said Hammad Ahmad, Imam.

In a recent CBS News poll asking, “Do you think the U.S should temporarily ban Muslims from other countries from entering the United States,” 38% said yes, 58% said no.

“Let me be very direct I believe that kind of a ban is contrary to America values, it’s contrary to our constitution, but I also think it’s a very dangerous foreign policy,” said Secretary of the State John Kerry on Face The Nation.

For many Muslims, they too say they face fear after the attacks, fear of retaliation because of their faith. Christians here in Maryland say, this is a time more than ever that we stand in faith and prayer and support one another.

“We’re standing against the harsh language, the divisiveness and hatred and we’re standing for the love and acceptance of each other as people of faith and prayer,” said Father Joe Muth.

While many see only a difference in faith, those attending see this is an opportunity to step outside their comfort zone, understanding and healing.

“That is the way things are going to change. It’s through friendships, through personal relationships,” said Paula Pratt.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim community U.S.A. is among the oldest American-Muslim organizations.

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