By Paul Gessler

MILLERSVILLE, Md. (WJZ) — Four people were killed in suspected DUIs over the weekend in Anne Arundel County.

The first crash occurred about 3 a.m. on Walton Ave. in Brooklyn Park. Police said a 2011 Nissan Altima driven by 49-year-old Christopher Davis ran a stop sign on Johnson Street. The car crashed into a living room where 68-year-old Pat Keogh was sleeping. Keogh was pinned between the car and a wall and later died at Shock Trauma.

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“Other family members are in the house,” Marc Limansky of Anne Arundel Co. Police said. “Very horrific scene. Very sad for the family.”

Keogh’s wife, Julia, showed WJZ inside the now boarded-up home. She did not speak on camera but wanted to convey her gratitude to the officers who stayed with her after they apprehended Davis.

Officials said Davis ran away from the crash scene but officers arrested him minutes later. He’s facing homicide, manslaughter and fleeing charges.

“Other officers who were responding were able to apprehend him quickly. Alcohol and other substance does appear to be a factor,” Limansky said.

Davis’ toxicology results are pending.

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On Saturday night, shortly before 11 p.m., a BMW X-5 Series driven by 44-year-old Brian Simmons was traveling West on Route 100 near Pasadena before crashing near the Route 10 Interchange. Simmons and two passengers—Diona Baber, 39 and Willette Marshall, 41 — died on the scene. Toxicology results are pending in the crash but alcohol is a suspected factor.

“Evidence within the vehicle heavily suggests that alcohol was a factor in this crash, along with excessive speed,” Limansky said.

Maryland State Police reported on Monday that its units responded to 15 DUI crashes this weekend, three of which involved multiple vehicles.

“You get behind the wheel, you affect not only yourself. You put other lives in danger, as well,” Maryland State Police spokesperson Ron Snyder said. “If you see something that’s worrisome to you, call 911. Don’t look the other way.”

Paul Gessler