BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Following a meeting with Gov. Larry Hogan in the state capital, Mayor Brandon Scott on Friday released a statement calling the talks “productive” and shared an open letter outlining some of the crime-fighting initiatives they discussed.

Speaking with reporters after the meeting, Scott said he and the governor were able to find common ground on the Baltimore Police Department’s Warrant Apprehension Task Force and better communication on and enforcement of violations of probation and parole.

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“There’s always, always agreement for us,” Scott said Thursday.

In his statement Friday, Scott said partnerships with federal and state agencies is a key part of the city’s Comprehensive Violence Prevention Plan.

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“I remain ready to work with any partners who can bring additional resources to sustainably, urgently, and holistically address violent crime,” he said.

The open letter the mayor shared provided more details on some of the programs he thinks would benefit from targeted state funding.

  • The Baltimore Police Department’s Warrant Apprehension Task Force: Last year, the group cleared 1,766 warrants, including 986 felony warrants, even though they the unit was “critically understaffed” after two detectives were shot in August, Scott wrote.

    “Additional manpower will help us execute even more of these mission critical warrants,” the mayor said.

    Funding would be available for outside agencies, such as police in Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties, the Maryland State Police, the MDTA Police and MTA Police, to provide assistance clearing warrants for violent offenders.

  • Enhanced Traffic Enforcement: Baltimore would like to add officers to “the most traversed market areas and tourism centers in the city,” Scott wrote. Funding would be available to the Maryland State Police, Maryland Transportation Authority and Maryland Transit Administration to provide assistance.
  • Increased Notifications And Enforcement Of Probation And Parole Violations: The city is requesting a “cooperative agreement” with the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, Department of Juvenile Services and other state and county agencies to detain people who violate their probation or parole.

    “Violent offenders that are identified as [a] potential risk of recidivism would be the primary focus,” Scott wrote.

    The city would also like improved notification requirements. Addressing this issue Thursday, Scott used the example of a person being released on probation after they’ve been charged with murder, saying the city is not made aware.

    “That’s a simple thing that should be happening, and I know the residents of Baltimore and Maryland would agree,” he said.

  • Mobile License Plate Readers: The police department would like to add an additional 100 readers to vehicles. There are already fixed readers at various locations in the city.

    “These additional mobile LPRs combined with the fixed ones would greatly increase investigative capabilities,” Scott wrote.

  • Expand Baltimore City Intelligence Centers: These information-gathering units were recently added to the Eastern, Western, Central and Southwestern police districts and have already made 111 gun arrests in 2022.

    The mayor said he would like to add the centers at the remaining five remaining districts, noting they “have been very successful in providing direct aid to our district detectives and direct action teams.

The meeting, which was originally scheduled for December but was postponed after Hogan got COVID-19, came days after the governor’s State of the State address, during which he singled out violent crime in the city.

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He promoted two pieces of legislation, the Violent Firearms Offender Act and Judicial Transparency Act, he said would focus on violent repeat offenders who use guns and any potential shortcomings in the judicial process.

CBS Baltimore Staff