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Bicyclists Want To Keep Loch Raven Reservoir Trails Open

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Alex DeMetrick 370x278 Alex DeMetrick
Alex DeMetrick has been a general assignment reporter with WJZ...
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BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Those who like a rough ride on their mountain bikes have some new support.

Alex DeMetrick reports it might help keep trails open in Loch Raven Reservoir.

It’s not peace and quiet mountain bikers are looking for at Loch Raven Reservoir. It’s the excitement of riding trails that aren’t easy to walk, let alone wheel over. But Baltimore City, which owns and manages Loch Raven, is worried about erosion as soil torn loose builds up as sediment in the reservoir.

So mountain bikers are seeking a compromise.

“Relocating those trails outside of the buffer zone and making them sustainable so we don’t get any erosion or sediment in the reservoir,” said Dave Ferraro, Mid-Atlantic Off Road Enthusiasts.

And now Baltimore County Councilman David Marks is backing the idea with a resolution.

“Trying to develop a compromise so they can expand the mountain bike trail in the reservoir and also maintain the quality of the reservoir’s water,” Marks said.

Currently, the city has fire trails open to biking, which mountain bikers find far too tame. It’s an issue that’s been active for years. The city’s concern in the past was about maintaining a healthy watershed.

“When you have ground compacted, vegetation can’t grow. When you start honeycombing an entire area, then you don’t have woods; you have a series of mud trails,” said DPW spokesman Kurt Kocher.

“We’re ready to develop a trail system, do sustainable trail work, mapping, trail clean up days, whatever’s needed,” Ferraro said.

“I think they’ve shown a good faith effort and hopefully the city can step up to the plate,” Marks said.

With compromise smoothing the way for a rough ride.

A county resolution has no legal force on the city, which continues its talks with the mountain biking community.

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