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Winter Weather Has Led To Worse Potholes Than Ever In Baltimore

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Jessica Kartalija 3 Jessica Kartalija
Jessica Kartalija joined the Eyewitness News team during the summer of...
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BALTIMORE (WJZ) — A major mess on Maryland roads. Fluctuating temperatures and conditions have meant more potholes.

Jessica Kartalija explains how city and state crews are having a hard time keeping up.

The freeze and thaw are creating a mess out there with more potholes than ever–and they’re getting worse.

A harsher than normal winter means more wear and tear on Maryland roads.

“We’ve had the fluctuation of cold and warm and it’s taken a toll on our roadways,” said Adrienne Barnes, Baltimore City Department of Transportation.

“We’ve filled over a thousand this year and normally that number is half that much this time of year,” Barnes said.

Typically, road crews wouldn’t be out repairing potholes until later this month, but they’re causing many issues for drivers.

“We are doing temporary repairs out until the weather breaks and we can do more permanent repairs on the street,” Barnes said.

Potholes are formed when water seeps into the asphalt, freezes and expands. As cars drive over, salt and other debris gets into the holes and turns them into one giant mess.

The freeze and thaw are causing problems on roads across Maryland. Highway crews are patrolling state roads and making repairs during non-peak travel times. When the traffic runs over it, it flattens it down.

And speaking of traffic, get used to it–in order to safely repair all of the damage, crews say to prepare for road closures.

“We want motorists to be patient with us as we fill those potholes as best we can,” Barnes said.

On average, over the past five years, the State Highway Administration has spent approximately $2.5 million per year on pothole repairs.

The city is asking that you call 311 to report potholes in your area.

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